Category Medieval Manuscript Studies

Beyond comprehension: handwriting and identity

I’ve just pushed a couple of article projects as far as I can. They are either now with collaborators, who will proceed to work their own magic, or under consideration by journals. As a result, I have been feeling slightly directionless—simultaneously under pressure to complete my current projects, but without definite things to do. There […]

Cheesesteaks and Brownstones: Manuscript Viewings in Philadelphia and NYC

Having just returned from a research trip to the States, I thought that I would give my blog a kick, as it has gone into hibernation of late. Jet-lag and a cold prevent me from tackling my impending deadlines, so I thought that I’d take time to be more creative. I hope that peripatetic manuscript […]

Quivering Hands and Shaky Morals: The Forger’s Tremor

This week, I’ve been doing research into the characteristics of tremors that indicate a range of neurological and physiological conditions. I’ve looked up everything from a Parkinson’s Disease shake to the kind of quiver that I get when I’ve misjudged my daily caffeine quota. It’s been fascinating to learn about the features that help doctors […]

A Palaeographer’s Adventures in Programming (3)

I’ve been away from my desk a lot over the last three weeks. I’ve spent many hours working with my supervisor to design a palaeography experiment involving a group of very willing and wonderful calligraphers from the York Scribes and Wyke Scribes groups, a WACOM digitising tablet and an adapted digital pen. I’m still grappling […]

A Palaeographer’s Adventures in Programming (2)

I’ve been away from my desk for around a week, making trips to the College of Arms in London to consult some of my medieval source material. The College of Arms is a royal corporation that is responsible for all matters relating to heraldry, that is, the granting of coats of arms and the recording […]

A Palaeographer’s Adventures in Programming (1)

I’ve been lax in updating my blog this summer, mainly due to the physical, intellectual and emotional demands of the conference season. However, I’m back at my desk now, and have begun to think about what I should share here. So, I thought I’d track my progress so far in becoming an interdisciplinary scholar: a […]

Turning over New Leaves: How to make a successful manuscript visit

I’m sitting in Los Angeles in the middle of a sojourn to The Huntington Library. It has a world-renowned collection, ranging from European medieval manuscripts, to medical collections, to historical items relating to the American Southwest. It also has one of the most beautiful botanical gardens I have ever set my eyes upon. I will […]

Leeds IMC Pre-thinkings: Hand, Eye and Brain in the Peripheries of the Medieval Book

I’m gearing up for a research trip to San Francisco and Los Angeles, whilst also looking forward to two conference appearances: at the Writing Britain conference at the University of Cambridge, right on the cusp of June and July, and the Leeds International Medieval Congress in July. As I prepare to talk about neurology, my […]

Being Middle Aged in the Middle Ages

As part of my project on neurodegenerative conditions in the medieval period, I have been doing some reading on getting older in the Middle Ages. I’ve been gripped by fifteenth century accounts of what happens to the body as a person shuffles towards, and off, the end of their mortal coil. What occurs before one […]

A Sensory Experience: A Touch/Hear/Smell Approach to Exhibiting Medieval Manuscripts

This weekend just gone, I attended the Hidden Hart Colloquium at Senate House in London. This was a day of celebration and exploration of the medieval manuscript and incunabula collection of R.E. Hart, which was bequeathed to Blackburn Museum in 1946 and is, frankly, amazing. The colloquium was a fantastic day in many ways. You […]